The danger of being swamped by confident idiots

The Trump phenomenon and the influence of One Nation on local politics highlight how irrational beliefs seem to be shaping world events to a disturbing degree, writes Hugh Harris.

Source: The danger of being swamped by confident idiots - The AIM Network

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Five years ago, who’d have thought Donald Trump could become the leader of the free world? Truth may be stranger than fiction, but if there’s any lesson here, it’s that too many people prefer fiction to the truth. Conspiracy theories have gripped the public imagination to such an extent that a dangerous novice stands at the White House lawn.

Acting as a mirror for America’s anger, prejudices and grandiose delusions, he relies on the public consuming a diet of lies, conspiracy and misinformation. Working back from whatever outcome would “make American great again, Trump proposes ideas and solutions on the fly – building a $25 billion wall, or deporting 11 million immigrants – seemingly unconcerned with how implausible, dangerous, or just plain stupid these ideas might be. An egomaniac who believes his own latest thought bubble is good enough to become policy for the world’s most powerful country, may soon learning how to operate the nuclear codes.

But evidently, stupidity knows no borders. Closer to home, we have One Nation’s Malcolm Roberts, who’s still enthralled by the vintage conspiracy theory that Jewish International Bankers control the world. He may have read Pauline Hanson’s ironically titled book, The Truth, in which she supports the crazy paranoia about the “New World Order”.

Since that déjà vu moment, when her quavering falsetto echoed through the Senate chamber, informing us that we’re in danger of being swamped by Muslims (not Asians), her support has quadrupled.

Mysteriously, the conspicuous failure of Asians to overrun us, hasn’t dampened Hanson’s confidence, or fatally wounded her credibility. Quite the opposite, in fact. Why is this so?

An answer may be found in the Dunning-Kruger effect: the curious phenomenon of “confident idiots” emboldened by their own ignorance, rather than cautioned by it.

The 1999 Dunning-Kruger study found those armed with low metacognitive skills grossly overestimated their own competence in metacognitive tasks.  Those with test scores in the 12th percentile estimated themselves to be in the 62nd.

And so, according to David Dunning, those with intellectual deficits are often “blessed with an inappropriate confidence, buoyed by something that feels to them like knowledge”.

This hasn’t passed through history unremarked: Recall Shakespeare – “a fool thinks himself to be wise but the wise man knows himself to be a fool”.

As Dunning states:

“Logic itself almost demands this lack of self-insight: For poor performers to recognize their ineptitude would require them to possess the very expertise they lack…”

The Dunning-Kruger effect applies to all humans. Beleaguered by an impressive array of confirmation biases which evolved to allow us to survive in a bewildering world of imperfect knowledge, we’ve adapted in ways which compensate for the gaps by applying greater certainty. The effect is something to be conscious of and to guard against.

Misbeliefs, according to Dunning, arise from cherished ideals, “narratives about the self, ideas about the social order—that essentially cannot be violated”.

“And any information that we glean from the world is amended, distorted, diminished, or forgotten in order to make sure that these sacrosanct beliefs remain whole and unharmed”.

Scorn of scientific expertise represents the hallmark of the “confident idiot”. Climate change denial has become the bellwether of a conspiracy theory epidemic, which has taken hold of many otherwise intelligent people. Luminaries such as Alan Jones and Andrew Bolt think climate change is part of a one world government conspiracy, aided and abetted by the United Nations, our own Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the CSIRO. But somehow they are apparently embarrassed by Malcom Roberts assertions that’s it’s all a NASA cover up. Alternatively, Donald Trump thinks the global warming hoax was created by “the Chinese to make U.S manufacturing non-competitive”.

Increasingly, the ability to discard inconvenient truths, to suspend belief in scientific fact, and to succumb to half-truths and spin, becomes a necessary skill-set used to choose whatever belief butters our bread, or suits our biases. Google provides an easy way of aligning the world to suit one’s prejudices: using the wrong-way round research method of finding the argument to suit the conclusion. Just by falling down a hole in the internet, crackpot theorist’s such as Flat Earthers, 9/11-Truthers, Chem-trailers, and Anti-Vaxxers, can find all the “empirical evidence” they need.

Science is not above reproach, or immutable. But its limits are well established enough. Adhering to established scientific fact should be a prerequisite for participating in public debate. Political correctness might have gone too far, but it’s consequences pale in comparison to scientific incorrectness.

Hopefully, Donald Trump won’t become President of the United States and we’ll look back on his candidacy as a grotesque caricature which appeared briefly, and then floated away, like a blimp at New York’s Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. But the 50 million or so US citizens who’ll vote for Trump represent a more widespread malaise in critical thinking.

Muslims or Mexicans aren’t about to “swamp” us anytime soon. But we needn’t consult our tea leaves or call a psychic to recognise the danger posed by the Dunning-Kruger effect, and to wonder why we’re not doing more to mitigate the influence of confident idiots.

7 Comments for “The danger of being swamped by confident idiots”

Meredith Doig

Meredith Doig

says:

And your evidence for this assertion is, Aziz?

Aziz

says:

It can’t be given in this space, Meredith. May be my book is one of the sources where it may be found. Despite being in the “wrong” political party, Malcolm Roberts’ views have substance, one has to have that cognitive depth to get it. Same cognitive depth is required to distinguish science from pseudoscience. There is no scientific evidence of climate changing in foreseeable future. Only “confident idiots” think there is, because they have the means to convince other “confident idiots” that computer games are serious science. Computer models have proved GIGO times and times again but they just don’t get it. They don’t read the news either that an internal whistle-blower has just exposed NOAA’s acts, among many similar exposures before it. Invoking Flat Earthers, 9/11-Truthers, Chem-trailers, and Anti-Vaxxers, and putting these on the same plane to deny anything you don’t like is too shallow. I hope this brief reply will not be misunderstood.

Meredith Doig

Meredith Doig

says:

Sorry, Aziz, but I do not agree with you. The evidence for human-induced climate change is unequivocal – http://climate.nasa.gov/evidence/

Aziz

says:

NASA landed man on the moon, but not an iota of that credit gravitates to their climate science. Earth’s climate is determined and controlled by the Eccentricity of its orbit around the Sun, the axial Tilt on the orbital plane, and the axial Wobble, also known as the precession of the equinoxes. NASA’s ‘evidence’ has no trace of these information; it is a joke of climate science, documents only a few minor to trivial ingredients to hoodwink the people with little or no background in science, including the “confident idiots”, the most powerful of whom are the politicians who signed the Paris Agreement and may think that ‘climate change’ is now proven. NASA invented this ‘climate science’, so its survival depends on consensus, not on evidence. Mrs Thatcher gave a concise and precise definition of ‘consensus’ in her memoir; it has no place in science. Einstein said of a book ‘Hundred Scientists against Einstein’ that “one would be enough if I am wrong”. Humans will pay dearly for their leaders’ folly, and Australians are already paying, if only they learn the lesson at the end, albeit at a cost.

Aziz

says:

Wise men say that people in glass house should not trow stones at others. Hugh Harris himself is a severe sufferer of Dunning-Kruger effect. I wish he realised it.

Hugh Harris

Hugh Harris

says:

Hi Asiz,

It turns out you think I suffer from the Dunning-Kruger effect because I’m not a climate change sceptic.

How do you explain the disturbing trajectory of carbon dioxide levels of the NASA graph?

Does it not worry you that 97% of scientists disagree with you? How do explain that?

Aziz

says:

Trajectory of CO2 is not disturbing at all. It is the ignorance about what “climate” is in the first place that has deluded some people. Please read my replies to Meredith and the following petition led by a prominent climate scientist (I’m a signatory):
Dr. Richard S. Lindzen
PhD, Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Meteorology, Emeritus, MIT, Member of National Academy of Sciences, author of numerous papers on climate and meteorology
PETITION
We urge the United States government, and others, to withdraw from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). We support reasonable and cost-effective environmental protection. But carbon dioxide, the target of the UNFCCC is not a pollutant but a major benefit to agriculture and other life on Earth. Observations since the UNFCCC was written 25 years ago show that warming from increased atmospheric CO2 will be benign — much less than initial model predictions.

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